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Most managers miss mental health signs in staff, says Mind

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Less than half of employees think their managers would notice if they had mental health symptoms, despite two in three managers saying they feel confident in promoting wellbeing, a survey from Mind has found.


Only 45 per cent of the 44,000 employees approached for the survey said they feel that their manager would be able to spot if they were having problems with their mental health.

Managers also said they could do with more support. Around two in five (41 per cent) said they felt their employer contributed to their skills to support an employee experiencing poor mental health, while two in three managers felt confident promoting wellbeing.

The data revealed that mental health problems are common among staff — more than seven in 10 employees (71 per cent) have experienced mental health problems in their lives, while over one in two (53 per cent) employees are affected by poor mental health in their current workplace.

Emma Mamo, head of Workplace Wellbeing at Mind, commented: “With mental health problems so common among employees, it’s important that every workplace – no matter the size – makes staff wellbeing a priority. It’s also vital that employers make sure managers know how to spot and support colleagues who might be struggling with issues like stress, anxiety or depression.”

Research was from Mind’s Workplace Wellbeing Index 2018–19 which surveyed 100 companies.

Managers need to know how to spot and support colleagues who might be struggling, says Mind. Photograph: iStock/fizkes

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