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NEWS: Grenfell inquiry to consider adequacy of building and fire regulations

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The public inquiry into the cause of the Grenfell tower fire has begun today after the prime minister accepted terms of the inquiry.


Sir Martin Moore-Bick, the chairman leading the inquiry into the disaster, said he had “considered carefully” over 550 written responses in order to arrive at the terms which describe the purpose and scope of the Inquiry.

The terms are:

  • To examine the immediate cause or causes of the fire and the means by which it spread to the whole building
  • The design and construction of the building and the decisions relating to its modification, refurbishment and management
  • The scope and adequacy of the building regulations, fire regulations and other legislation, guidance and industry practice relating to the design, construction, equipping and management of high-rise residential buildings
  • Whether such regulations were complied with in the case of Grenfell
  • Fire prevention and fire safety measures in place at Grenfell on the day of 14 June 2017 – considering questions put by submissions such as escape routes and fire alarms, plus arrangement for ensuring the safety of elderly and the disabled
  • To report its findings to the PM as soon as possible and make recommendations
  • response of local and central government in the days following the fire

Regulations to be examined include the Construction Design and Management Regulations 2015, the Fire Safety Order 2005 and associated guidance. These are also likely to be included in the terms of reference for the independent building regulations review, the former also expected to be published by this summer. 

In accepting the terms, Theresa May said: “It is vital that there is justice for the victims of this appalling tragedy and for their families who have suffered so terribly.

"The terms of reference set out by Sir Martin address crucial issues such as the cause of the fire and the adequacy of building and fire regulations which will allow the inquiry to get to the truth of what happened and learn the lessons to stop a similar catastrophe happening in the future.”

The next stage is an initial report dealing with the cause of the fire and the means with which it spread to the whole building - expected by Easter 2018.

The function of an inquiry is to find out what happened during the event or the action that was of serious public concern and to find out what can be done to prevent it happening again.

Public inquiries cannot determine civil or criminal liability, but their findings can be used in a criminal or civil case.

To find out the latest information on the Inquiry, including details of evidence, hearings and how to contact the Inquiry team can be found on the Inquiry website here 

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