Everyone should have the right to live with dignity and free from fear, whoever they are or wherever they live

“We all need to work together to ensure that injustice for ethnic and minority groups is a thing of the past” says British Safety Council Chief Executive.

The British Safety Council and Mates in Mind have pledged to support the struggle for justice and equality for all ethnic and minority groups, wherever they are in the world.  Speaking today from his home, Mike Robinson, Chief Executive of the British Safety Council said:

“Workplaces that foster diversity and inclusion also generally promote wellbeing and improved mental health – all things that we at the British Safety Council are passionate about. Working with our members I pledged that we must renew our efforts to ensure that injustice for ethnic and minority groups is a thing of the past. We are one civilisation, one world, made up of billions of unique, amazing people. It is our combined voices, approaches and thinking that make us who we are as human beings. Diversity should be one of our greatest strengths”.

With members in over 60 countries, the British Safety Council Group is committed to promoting acceptance and non-discrimination in the workplace and beyond. This includes a zero-tolerance policy against any kind of prejudice or discrimination.

British Safety Council Group wants people to thrive at work and for workplaces to promote diversity, which in turn contributes to all of our wellbeing. As a Group it will always strive to put inclusion at the heart of its work.

Since its foundation in 1957, British Safety Council has campaigned to protect workers from accidents, hazards and unsafe conditions. Today the legacy of the British Safety Council’s founder, James Tye, is a vision that no-one should be injured or made ill through their work.

We all have mental health and Mates in Mind recognises that discrimination and inequality can be a major factor in poor mental health and can impact significantly in workplace settings. Addressing mental health at work and creating a safe environment to start the conversation around mental health issues and the causes of poor mental health is a key aim of Mates in Mind support.

This renewed focus was explained by Mike Robinson:

 “Like millions around the world I was horrified by the footage of George Floyd’s death just over two weeks ago. I have been moved by the strength of feeling that has been shown both in the United States and elsewhere. The protests led by #BlackLivesMatter have struck a chord that cannot be ignored and we all should respond.”

James Rudoni, Managing Director of Mates in Mind said:

“Racism as a cause of mental illness, or factor that leads to poor mental health, is an awful reality. It can exist in many forms and not only through interpersonal assaults. There is clear evidence that racism leads to mental illnesses, stress, anxiety, depression and where physical assault is involved, can lead to post-traumatic stress.”

“In our collective efforts to eradicate racism and discrimination, Mates in Mind will be promoting collaborative leadership as an essential ingredient of our work and ensuring that our education, training and signposting services better reflect the diverse needs of those who come to us for help”.